Rent a Ranger. Schuh for you.

Werner was already well impressed by the Kitzsteinhorn Glacier on a visit with his father when he was only seven years old. Having spent many years abroad, including 20 years as helicopter ski guide with Mister Mike Wiegele in Canada, he has now returned to the Kitzsteinhorn and is a resident National Park ranger. Werner Schuh guides the summer guests of the Zell am See-Kaprun region through the National Park Gallery at the Kitzsteinhorn twice a day. Free of charge as a pleasant first step and taster tour into the rich world of adventure programmes of the Hohe Tauern National Park.



A well-travelled man who returned to his roots. “I simply applied when the job as National Park ranger was advertised six years ago“, explains Werner Schuh, who studied communication and sports science in Salzburg, his start in the 16-strong team of rangers of the popular Salzburger Land nature reserve. Answering my question about why he is looking for his role as nature’s mediator here in the mountains, he says that the compact tour through the glacier’s National Park Gallery is like a first step into the big world of the National Park for everyone who wants to discover more on their holiday, making use of the information and insider tips of the qualified staff which is always very reliable. While we proudly look to the Glockner and other majestic 3.000 metres high mountains, there are many people happily moving around with amazed faces approx. 200 altitude metres below us.



Back to the roots.

Werner‘s day is very diverse, just like the programme through which he and his colleagues lead. His radius of action stretches from Lungau to the Wildgerlostal Valley and his audience is international. “Tourism has surely contributed to people opening their mind“, he says. “The times when one valley did not talk to the other (neighbouring) valley are long gone“, so the local ranger. Werner, who does not only love his job but takes it very seriously, also goes into the many side valleys as much as possible and explores the areas where no official guided tours are offered. There he has his “Platzerl“, his places, as he calls them. Werner Schuh visits the same site again and again to quietly study fauna and flora, for example, in the Obersulzbachtal Valley. Through his repeated presence, even timid wildlife gets used to humans. Such sites are a must when he, for example, leads a group of British birdwatchers on an observation tour to the golden eagle.



“Yes, I am on Facebook. And I have already guided some influencers.“

Digitalisation is inevitable, so Werner, but he has already gained some good experiences. Because social networks and almost real-time communication are important when it comes to the localisation of ibexes or eagles. Permanent availability is not always provided, especially in some valleys. It does happen that boys and girls react somewhat confused and disorientated when Werner takes school classes into a zone without any mobile network. But the initial scepticism quickly turns into curiosity and juvenile zest for action. In fact, the youngsters even enjoy and blossom in the analogue world of nature.


Even though he doesn’t need it with his outdoor job and plenty of activity, Werner likes to balance his working life by spending time at the water. A beautiful alternative to the rugged summits and the solitary of the densely-forested valleys in the heart of the National Park. But he can’t let go of the mountains completely. He often visits the Triglav National Park, the Slovenian brother of the Hohe Tauern. But there is one insider tip Werner would like to share: The “Explorer Tour“, during which participants can explore four altitudinal ranges, is available from summer 2017 and is a new programme the management of the National Park devised in winter.Even though he doesn’t need it with his outdoor job and plenty of activity, Werner likes to balance his working life by spending time at the water. A beautiful alternative to the rugged summits and the solitary of the densely-forested valleys in the heart of the National Park. But he can’t let go of the mountains completely. He often visits the Triglav National Park, the Slovenian brother of the Hohe Tauern. But there is one insider tip Werner would like to share: The “Explorer Tour“, during which participants can explore four altitudinal ranges, is available from summer 2017 and is a new programme the management of the National Park devised in winter.